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REEFER & BOXCARS

You probably know the difference between a sedan, an SUV, and a pickup truck, but do you know the difference between a boxcar and a reefer? Just how vehicles are designed to cater to different needs of transporting passengers and cargo, various rail cars accommodate various freight shippers’ needs. This article compares reefers and boxcars and examines how they are built, what they carry, and their differences.

A refrigerator car (or “reefer”) is a refrigerated boxcar (U.S.) is a piece of railroad rolling stock. They are designed to carry perishable freight at specific temperatures. Refrigerator cars differ from simple insulated boxcars. They also differ from ventilated boxcars. Those two are used for transporting fruit. Neither of which are fitted with cooling apparatus. Reefers can be ice-cooled. They come equipped with mechanical refrigeration systems. Or utilize carbon dioxide. They use either dry ice or in liquid form as a cooling agent. Milk cars may or may not include a cooling system. Other types of “express” reefers also may not be cooled. But they are equipped with high-speed trucks. They may have other modifications to travel with passenger trains. Reefers are really boxcars with insulation and a fridge inside. Most modern reefers are 57′ long while most boxcars are 50′.

REFRIGERATED BOXCAR

It carries Perishable freight, like fresh fruits, vegetables, frozen food, beverages, meat, poultry, seafood, and cheese. How it is built: Refrigerated boxcars (commonly referred to as “reefers”) are much like traditional boxcars but with one significant difference: they are temperature controlled.

REEFER (REFRIGERATED BOXCAR)

BOXCAR

BOXCAR

It carries: Boxcars can carry a wide variety of crated or palletized freight, including paper, lumber, packaged goods, beverages, and (shocker) boxes. How it is built: Boxcars are fully enclosed and, true to their name, are the most “boxy” looking of all the rail car types. Boxcars typically have doors on the side of the car but can have them at the ends, too. Because they are enclosed, boxcars protect the freight inside from the weather during transport.

It carries: Boxcars can carry a wide variety of crated or palletized freight. Including paper, lumber, packaged goods, beverages, and (shocker) boxes.

How it is built: Boxcars are fully enclosed and, true to their name. They are the most “boxy” looking of all the rail car types. Boxcars typically have doors on the side of the car but can have them at the ends, too. Because they are enclosed, boxcars protect the freight inside from the weather during transport.

SOURCES

https://www.up.com/customers/track-record/tr181121_rail_car_types.htm

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