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BUS STOP

Our fleet of city buses was very worn out by the time I was old enough to ride. Russell and I were 7 years old when he suggested we take a ride over to Laurium (3 miles) from our neighbourhood in Calumet. We scrounged up the fifteen cents and a nickel for a transfer if needed to get back home. It was a daring adventure at the time as our parents had no clue what us kids did in the summer roaming around town. We got home an hour later and none knew the difference until we bragged about it. Looking back, I’m glad we did it because the bus service was shut down a year or so after that. The three ladies are going to catch this bus. Sitting on the bench are a couple of old scoffers betting on whither the bus would even make it to this stop. They know this particular unit has a bad right rear axle bearing, a wrist pin knock in the engine and chattering clutch. In the waning days of operation, it’s called “break down maintenance”. And the dog, he’s been caught sneaking on the bus before. This is a people-friendly bus stop with a newspaper dispenser, mailbox, bench and phone booth. If you have a long wait, the diner can provide a quick bite to eat and/or something to drink.

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URBAN/INDUSTRIAL DIRT #2000

Very few industries could afford crushed rock for their driveways and work areas. Junkyards were a prime example of this. Our special blend of rock powder is to represent dirt that would have an accumulation of chemicals and oils churned up in it over a period of time. This is the color used in the scene below.

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Hot Rod F7’s

A couple “Hot Rod” F7’s are used to haul our coal train as the “A” unit has a huge lead weight for ultimate traction. The cars are my operating type with live coal loads able to pull 18 of them. I’m going to break down and install window glazing, number boards, and constant lighting soon. The sound for these will have two engines running with one of them miss firing.

The pilot was cut away and a die-cast snowplow installed with coupler. Brass wire hand railings were attempted in a few places. Five chime brass horns let you know when this train is coming through. The cast on fan and exhaust panels cut out and detailed ones installed. Some opening was cut out of the side body panels to match those of the “B” Unit Highliner kit. Graffiti artists attacked the “B” unit to devalue this engine set from the rest on the fleet.

More information on loads.

Hot Rod F7's
Hot Rod F7’s
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Wood Boxcar Freight House

A few months ago, I got an Ayres Scale Models “Box Car Freight House” on eBay. This kit dates back to the early ’60s and is all wood like much the models from that era. My Winslow engine service area was a perfect location for this kit as it goes well with a Campbell loading dock that was already there. The scene has become quite congested and taken years to get it that way.

What’s an Ayres kit? Thomas J. Ayres was a 50’s kit builder in California and many of the structures were adapted into the Campbell Scale Models line of products when Leo Campbell bought it from Ayres. Ayres continued to work for Leo for a number of years at least in the capacity as a photographer. He is credited for all those sharp pictures used in the Campbell ads and color catalogues. Looking at this scene, I realized that four other Ayres kits are in it. The Sand House, Coaling Station, Water Tank and Pump House. Kevin Barnett worked for Campbell and designed the Water Treatment Plant at lower right in this photo.

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This is about as close to narrow gauge as I get

Some cars are old-time antiques and others home-made. Everyone will be featured separately as I rebuilt them for better running standards. The engine is a brass 0-6-0 that I bought from an old friend in Tucson AZ. about 14 years ago. The purpose of buying it was for this type of train. It has that John Allen flavour and I’m very pleased with it pulling 10 cars on all my grades. That first gondola has wavy sides to emphasize it’s seen heavy use. Notice the wavy edge of the layout to break up the straight edge of most layouts. There is no point in more scenery in this area until the backdrop is installed.#116 Apache Stone Products used in this scene. I never showed you how to make the three varieties of cactus!

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J L Innovative’s Storm Lake Mobil

I ordered this kit sight unseen and was delighted with the design when it showed up in the mail on Friday. It took about 16 hours to build, so here it is.It’s referred to as a “Drum” style building that was popular in the forties.I used a 1/8 Masonite base and brushed yellow glue on it and sprinkled on my #1290 Concrete Paving Material.
I added paper towel holders and mounted them on the island light poles. The kit comes with all the details pictured except the trash can on the island.
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Wood Boxcar Freight House

A few months age, I got an Ayres Scale Models “Box Car Freight House” on eBay. This kit dates back to the early ’60s and is all wood like much the models from that era. My Winslow engine service area was a perfect location for this kit as it goes well with a Campbell loading dock that was already there. The scene has become quite congested and taken years to get it that way.

What’s an Ayres kit? Thomas J. Ayres was a 50’s kit builder in California and many of the structures were adapted into the Campbell Scale Models line of products when Leo Campbell bought it from Ayres. Ayres continued to work for Leo for a number of years at least in the capacity as a photographer. He is credited for all those sharp pictures used in the Campbell ads and color catalogs. Looking at this scene, I realized that four other Ayres kits are in it. The Sand House, Coaling Station, Water Tank and Pump House. Kevin Barnett worked for Campbell and designed the Water Treatment Plant at lower right in this photo.

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TREES, CHAPARRAL AND LOW GROUND COVER FOR SANDSTONE CANYON

The area around this Campbell Scale Models “Tall Curved Trestle” (two kits end to end) was done with a single layer of paper bag scenery. Planting the pine trees worked out ok, but if foam were underneath, it would have been better.

Step 1.

The tallest features for this scenery are the pine trees and should be planted last. I decided that it would work out best if their locations are established first, then remove them for installing the low ground cover and underbrush. The tall pine trunks were temporally planted for knowing were the dead needle litter (#16) should be placed. Some grass flock was glued in place and then a few Tufts of stand up grass. More of this is yet to be installed as it looks to barren for now. You can see a tree at left with the Air Fern branches that are half-finished.

Step 2.

Adding a small pond
There was a flat area at the base of the canyon so I placed a small pond there. Micro Engineering ties are in place for the track leading to the Saw Mill.
More ground cover and trees

1375 Wood Debris, #2 Dead & Alive Ground Cover, #4 Yellow Grass, #5 Green Grass and a few rocks (#1205 and 1207 Cajon Sandstone). Clumps of Sage Brush are at the far right and just right of centre are some Utah Junipers made with real Sage armatures. Rails are laying loose on the scenics roadbed with the Mauve ballasted mainline in the foreground. Every tree has been done by different techniques to see what looks best. My focus will be on what materials will have the best longevity over the years. Natural foliage materials will fade and become brittle with time. To avoid this, I’ll use Hemp Twine for the branches instead of the Asparagus Fern. You can see a tree with only the Asparagus Fern at far right. To the left of that tree is one done with Hemp branches.

Pine needles are short snips of jute twine I stained dark green.

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Building Concrete Slabs for Street & Highways

I’m beginning to favour the technique described below as it gives me more modelling options. At any rate, I don’t end up with overly antiseptic look working with plastic.

The cardboard I use is from an old Priority Mailbox because it’s the thickness that works best. Using a carpenters square, I cut my slabs in rectangles 2′ X 2 1/2″. Sidewalks made first, and you can make them with thicker cardboard, Masonite or even soft pine paint stir sticks. The above picture has thicker cardboard. The gas station below was built on a thin Masonite base that includes the sidewalks, and the buildings to the right have paint stir sticks. Working with six slabs at a time, coat the layout base with Carpenter wood glue and press them in place. Because the cardboard will curl, now cover the top of the carton. Use a cardboard scrap to trawl the glue flat for both applications. Now sprinkle the #1290 Concrete powder on the wet glue. Use a pallet knife to trawl the powder flat. When the dust gets to gluey from the glue below, hit the area with a light water spray to make it workable. An occasional slab can be shimmed up slightly on one edge to model a frost heave, but don’t overdo it.

Before the glue sets hard, clean out the joints with a sharp tool. I use an angle piece of brass as a corner tool for curbs and gutters after everything is dry, sand away any lumps and rough edges.

To model large cracks, I’ll cut some of that unfinished cardboard in random jagged pieces and then install in the method described above.

I photoed the scene before everything had a chance to dry and couldn’t sweep up the loose powder on the street. It does show how deep cracks in the concrete looks.

Products Used