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Comic Strip

Using photos for a cartoon strip require close ups that keep everything in focus. Flaws in the model work now show up dramatically such as the unpainted wagon spokes, shiny cloths and the right shoulder of the man not glued in place properly.

To make the characters larger in the picture box, you need to crop them out before you reduce the picture size. Now the flaws in the man really stand out.

You now need to decide if the overall scene will be of interest to the readers even though the characters are small and without action. Traditionally, cartoons are about the characters and the artist draws them bigger in the frame to show features and action.

Notice the expression and body language of Walt in my drawing. I need to find a way of drawing my characters and overlaying them on my photos for many of the frames. Just drawing the characters would save a lot of time when using existing scenery for a cartoon.

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Campbell’s kit #353 LCL Freight House

You need one of these on the layout as they were common for Less than Car Load pickups and deliveries. Lots of little building add potential activity to your railroad. I believe the kit comes with those unpainted crates and barrels that I have not detailed yet. One could scratch build this for a couple of bucks, however, I acquired this from Campbell’s when I did some work for the company some years back.

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Scratch building a George Sellios design service station

I don’t believe this was ever a Fine Scale Miniature kit that George built for his layout. You can see what I’m talking about by referring to page 33 in George’s book about his Franklin & South Manchester Railroad. The station also reappears on page 63 in the November Model Railroader. His has red trim and I went with the Sinclair green. I have about $40.00 in the scene that is mostly the cost of the detail parts. We had 10 service stations in Calumet and I worked at one as a teenager and hung out at several others in town. This was made to go with my Gasoline Alley scene next door as that garage is at right. Caserio’s owned the Sinclair bulk plant and service station next to the railroad tracks on West Pine Street in Calumet. My friends parents owned a Sinclair Station a few blocks away on East Pine Street. Mine is just called the “Calumet” station. Every layout needs a close up action spot in every town, so this is the model chosen for the purpose here.

There is an outside service area where all that equipment is displayed. The scene is early 1950’s so the cars will be that and older. A corrugated metal fence frames in the property.

There is an outside service area where all that equipment is displayed. The scene is early 1950’s so the cars will be that and older. A corrugated metal fence frames in the property.

Street and sidewalk curbs have been touched up with #1290 Concrete Paving material. A row of #1155 Basalt Rip/Rap rock was placed between the street and railroad right of way. The now painted cast metal details are; windshield wiper display cabinet, tire changer, battery charger, four shelve cabinet, 10 ton press, work bench (wood), air powered grease pump on barrel, wheel balancer and bearing packer. Other service station equipment is in the scene also. It’s never winter on this part of the layout so vehicles can be worked on outside year around.

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J L Innovative’s Storm Lake Mobil

I ordered this kit sight unseen and was delighted with the design when it showed up in the mail on Friday. It took about 16 hours to build, so here it is.It’s referred to as a “Drum” style building that was popular in the forties.I used a 1/8 Masonite base and brushed yellow glue on it and sprinkled on my #1290 Concrete Paving Material.
I added paper towel holders and mounted them on the island light poles. The kit comes with all the details pictured except the trash can on the island.
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L.C.L. Freight House

This is one of the easiest kits you could build for a little train action. One could even scratch build it for a few bucks even if you have to buy the scribed siding material. The sand road is a blend of 3/5 th’s #1151 Basalt, 1/5 th of #1031 Black cinder and 1/5 th #1011 Red Cinder. This blend looks very close to the mining stamp sand used all around Calumet Michigan.

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Leaning tower at 2nd and Commerce

An eight-sided gate man’s tower that houses controls for pneumatically operated crossing gates. These octagonal towers were built by the Milwaukee Road found around the city including this one on at 2nd and Commerce in Milwaukee. The authors found this one unique because it leaned to the South. It dates back to the 1900s and was still in use during the ’60s. The article included scale drawing and photographs but not a model of the structure. I saw no point in making my model lean because of my freelance location.

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POWER FOR THE COMPANY BRASS

You must admit, those brass engines host a lot of detail. I bought one to see what all the ballyhoo was about them. My first curiosity was to compare its performance against those die cast clunkers. Second, is the detail applied neatly? Third, Is it worth the extra money over reworking one of my clunkers? The answer is yes. What disappointed me was it makes the sound of an electric train and not a steam engine. Even with sound injected into the atmosphere, you hear the mechanical noise that would be ok if it were a diesel. Accept the fact it’s a good toy and enjoy it. The fact that its brass, I’ll use it for a “favorite train” and pull the “company special” with the first-class varnish and a couple of private cars if it whims me.